Does technology in schools improve education? (via The World Economic Forum)


The availability of computers by themselves doesn’t alter the need for teachers to teach students basic skills and content, nor does it change the need for students to study, practice and learn those skills and content. In fact, having computers in schools serves as a distraction rather than an aid.


This is Probably a Good Time to Say That I Don’t Believe Robots Will Eat All the Jobs …

Marc Andreessen

Image; Tobias Higbie Image: Tobias Higbie


One of the most interesting topics in modern times is the “robots eat all the jobs” thesis. It boils down to this: Computers can increasingly substitute for human labor, thus displacing jobs and creating unemployment. Your job, and every job, goes to a machine.

This sort of thinking is textbook Luddism, relying on a “lump-of-labor” fallacy – the idea that there is a fixed amount of work to be done. The counterargument to a finite supply of work comes from economist Milton Friedman — Human wants and needs are infinite, which means there is always more to do. I would argue that 200 years of recent history confirms Friedman’s point of view.

If the Luddites had it wrong in the early 19th century, the only way their line of reasoning works today is if you believe this time is…

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Investors Updating Their Investors: Inside Homebrew’s First Annual LP Meeting

Less “paid marketing when you should be building word of mouth and virality.”
Less “salaries when you should be building a culture and vision that pulls the best talent towards you with generous equity compensation instead of cash.”

Hunter Walk

Our seed fund Homebrew celebrated its first birthday yesterday, meaning we’re still in diapers but walking tall. I’ve written before about our fundraising process and how it very much resembles that of a startup. Last week we held our first annual LP meeting, when venture funds get their investors together with updates on operations and results. We brief our major investors quarterly and decided to model our LP meeting after what “big funds” do, albeit with a few Homebrew flourishes🙂 Logistically this meant an afternoon session with presentations/Q&A then a dinner with founders/advisors. Here’s what we covered – it’s a bit inside baseball but just as with the funding post linked above, we think exposing the mechanics of venture can help entrepreneurs and future investors (plus, we learn a lot from any resulting discussions). As a reminder, our $35m Fund I has the overwhelming majority of capital from four…

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